Catalyst hoax exposed!

Sources close to Hygiene Solutions Ltd.  have revealed that the 45 minute deactivation phase of the Deprox cycle, which is claimed to bring the hydrogen peroxide level down to 1ppm, was recently doubled to 90 minutes.

This is a tacit admission that the catalytic deactivation units, added in great haste last year are hopelessly inadequate.

The change pushes the vaunted Deprox cycle time to over 3 hours – this is not competitive in the face of the Bioquell BQ-50, which for a typical side ward with ensuite (50m3) has a cycle time of just 1 hour 20 minutes. Given the cost of a hospital bed in the UK is about £400/day, this difference is very significant.

When Deprox was introduced, it had no catalyst whatever, and the hydrogen peroxide concentration when the room was re-entered was typically around 10ppm – ten times the legal limit.

As increasing evidence accumulated that Deprox operators were suffering serious respiratory damage, Hygiene Solutions endeavored to conceal the problem by turning down the amount of H2O2 the machines emitted. All Deprox machines were turned down to just 1/6th of the original H2O2 aerial concentration. This indeed left the concentration below 1ppm on re-entry, but of course it didn’t decontaminate the hospital room.

In early 2016, Richard Marsh who had worked briefly as a consultant for Hygiene Solutions Ltd, attempted to warn the NHS and the HSE of this highly  dangerous practice, which was leaving 1000s of hospital rooms contaminated with C. difficile and MRSA across the UK, Australia and New Zealand.

Hygiene Solutions directors Rick Fentiman and Mark Fentiman of course categorically denied the claim, but hastily recalled all the Deprox units and retrofitted a crude catalyst, consisting of a commercial bathroom extract fan and a carbon palladium filter. According to a former employee, the catalyst was attached with cable ties and insulating tape.

These catalysts worked well when fresh, but quickly became hopelessly contaminated with dust and silver nitrate  – their efficiency dropping to zero within a few dozen cycles.

Hygiene Solutions, ever innovative, came up with a new strategy. Where customers were using hydrogen peroxide meters to check the rooms before re-entry, the units would be turned down to the low 1/6th of nominal concentration. Where the customers were NOT checking before re-entry, they would leave the machines at the higher level. If one of these customers should complain of respiratory problems on re-entry, one of the directors would visit them with a “turned down” Deprox unit and an H2O2 meter, and demonstrate that the levels were within the safety limit.

In February 2017, Richard Marsh published “How to test your Deprox” This gave simple instructions to Deprox users whereby they could check the H2O2 concentration level that their machine was set to. This made Hygiene Solutions smoke and mirrors tactic rather risky – hence the recent decision to double the deactivation cycle time.

The conversation with a former Deprox operator reproduced below will give a taste of the utterly irresponsible attitude of the directors of the company.

Lying rick fentiman mark fentiman

And further…

Lying rick fentiman mark fentiman too.PNG

Advertisements

2 more Deprox operators hit with throat and lung damage.

Exchange of messages between Richard Marsh and a former Deprox operator. This brings the total of Deprox operators suffering chronic respiratory damage to four – the two mentioned below, plus Gordon Cunningham, plus Maria Cardioso from Worcester.

For the background to this issue, see Toxic Legacy

 

Deprox 1

Deprox 2

Deprox 3

Deprox 4

Reproduced below is a doctor’s letter to Hygiene Solutions Ltd, requesting information  to assist in treating  Maria Cardioso, an ISS Mediclean hospital cleaner who was operating Deprox units in the Worcestershire Royal Hospital. This was in January 2015. The operators above were still operating Deprox in 2016 without PPE and without being warned by Hygiene Solutions Ltd about the danger of the silver nitrate in the Deproxin fog they were inhaling.

maria-cardoso

Standard safety label for Silver Nitrate specifically warning of toxicity to lungs and mucous membranes.

AgNO3

CANBERRA SHARK ATTACK!

Deprox hales acipc 2017

On 2nd February 2017, in response to publication of the whistleblower exposé of the Deprox fraud, Specialist Hygiene Solutions Australia Pty Ltd declared voluntary liquidation, and Australian Deprox distributor Acute Healthcare hastily dropped the product from its catalogue.

However, in order to to maintain product registration with the ARTG (Australian Register of Therapeutic Devices) Hygiene Solutions (UK) must have a registered Australian company as sponsor.

It has emerged that a second business, under the name Specialist Hygiene Solutions Australia has been created with a new ABN  – this is a partnership, rather than a limited company – and this new entity has taken over sponsorship of the Deprox and Deproxin products.

Unfortunately, Australian business practices are less than transparent, and short of legal action it is impossible to identify who the beneficial owners of this Australian partnership are. The only identity given is “The Trustee for the RS & HR family Trust and others”  Like Panamian bank accounts and Cayman Island investment trusts, this legitimised  anonymity is very convenient for individuals wishing to invest in unethical or fraudulent trading, as funds can be easily laundered through a web of interconnected Australian family trusts.

However, a search of the history reveals that the original name of “The Trustee for the RS & HR family Trust and others” was “THE TRUSTEE FOR RS & HR FAMILY TRUST & THE TRUSTEE FOR THE AT SITE SUPPLIES TRUST & THE TRUSTEE FOR THE HALES TRUST”

Furthermore, a search of Australian trademarks reveals the following:

Deprox 4

The  LinkedIn profile shows that  Gregory Hales was a director of At Site Supplies, and is currently the director of SafeSmart Access. Both SafeSmart Access and Hygiene Solutions limited share the same Sydney, NSW address.

SafeSmart Access

Deprox hales

It seems likely  therefore that the Australian Deprox operation is run by Gregory Jay Hales, a prominent member of the so called “Hales Exclusive Brethren” a highly controversial religious sect headquartered in Sydney, Australia.

Australian relaunch in Canberra

Rick Fentiman, Hygiene Solutions Ltd director and self-appointed “Cambridge University Microbiologist” will be exhibiting at the Australasian College of Infection Prevention and Control (ACIPC) exhibition in Canberra, 20-22 November 2017. He will doubtless be bringing his “Proxcide” Mk. III Deprox prototype, as well as the Deprox and Ultra-V systems to display.

Hygiene Solutions Ltd has also splashed out $10,300 to become a “Bronze Sponsor” of the ACIP exhibition, over and above the $6,600 for the booth. This level of investment suggests a major push in to the Australian market, and it is rumoured that the Fentimans may be relocating to Australia along with their business, thus evading a number of impending legal actions in the UK. Given Australia’s historic function as a penal colony, this move would seem to be entirely appropriate.

Deprox 1

Any hospitals considering these systems should first give sober consideration to the tragic experience of the UCLH hospital in London, where a C. difficile epidemic following the introduction of the Deprox system led to an estimated 12 deaths over a period of 3 years.

 

Legal Action taken re. cyber-attack

 

Legal action is being taken against the directors of Hygiene Solutions Ltd in connection with flagrant breaches of the Computer Misuse Act 1990. See:

https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/1990/18/crossheading/computer-misuse-offences

The relevant sections of the Act are summarized below:

Computer misuse offences

1 Unauthorised access to computer material.
(1)A person is guilty of an offence if—
(a) he causes a computer to perform any function with intent to secure access to any program or data held in any computer, or to enable any such access to be secured ;
(b) the access he intends to secure, or to enable to be secured, is unauthorised; and
(c) he knows at the time when he causes the computer to perform the function that that is the case.
(3) A person guilty of an offence under this section shall be liable—
(a) on summary conviction in England and Wales, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to both;

daltons

 In the recent illegal cyber-attack, a number of LinkedIn articles were deleted. These will be republished from backup data over the next few weeks. Opportunity will be taken to update the articles as necessary. A link to the first of these articles is included below.

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/freedom-information-request-reveals-exact-c-richard-marsh/Deprox

As a number of deproxfraud.info readers have pointed out, some videos were also lost from the site as a result of the associated Vimeo and Youtube channels being hacked and deleted. These have now been restored, and are reproduced below:

TOM LISTER

Video Deprox

 

Shocking Ultra-V test results!

A comprehensive trial of the Hygiene Solutions Ltd Ultra-V decontamination system has exposed shocking discrepancies between the manufacturer’s claims and the actual performance of the system. Prof Peter Wilson, a consultant microbiologist at University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation (UCLH) tested the system against a variety of bacteria and spores using both contact plates and Biological Indicator discs. Six single patient isolation rooms were decontaminated and the results aggregated. The thorough in-vivo testing and the high reputation of the author and the UCLH Environmental Microbiology laboratory leave no doubt whatever as to the accuracy of the results.

Here are Hygiene Solutions’ claims, and the UCLH test results compared:

Claim:

Can achieve between a 6-log and a 4-log reduction of a broad spectrum of pathogens

Inactivates Clostridium difficile infection (C.diff.), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) even in light soiling

Test Result

C. difficile spores in low soiling, log reductions between log 0.1 and log 1.1 (see Table III below)

Claim:

Placed in one central location within each room, Ultra-V can effectively decontaminate all surfaces in the enclosed healthcare area within the shortest treatment time.

Test Method

“Hygiene Solutions Ultra-V™: a single-emitter device (UVC, λ=265nm) relocated intermittently as determined by sensors in room.”

Claim:

How long does the process take? Average side room would normally take 20 minutes to complete.

Test Result

Process time, NOT including preliminary manual clean, 1 hour and 19 minutes. (See table 1 below)

Summary:

Hygiene Solutions claims imply a validated log 4 to 6 reduction of C. difficile, even in light soiling, on all surfaces in a single patient room in about 20 minutes – without moving the unit from a central location.

In reality, even with a 79 minute process time, and multiple relocations of the unit to eliminate shadowed areas, the greatest log reduction achieved for C.difficile spores was log 1.1. That is about ONE THOUSANDTH of the claimed performance – in spite of the process time being extended 4 fold.

Table 1

Table III

Download the entire paper as a pdf:

Comparison of Two Whole-Room UV-Irradiation Systems for Enhanced Disinfection of Patient Rooms Contaminated with MRSA, carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium difficile spores

S. Ali, S. Yui, M. Muzslay, A.P.R. Wilson

Or read the article on the Journal of Hospital Infection site:

http://www.journalofhospitalinfection.com/article/S0195-6701(17)30455-3/fulltext

Fentiman’s Toxic Legacy

After two years of misinformation, deceit and outright lies, fake “Cambridge graduate microbiologist” Rick Fentiman has to admit that his Deprox process leaves hospital rooms and equipment contaminated with highly toxic silver nitrate dust. A recent investigation at the University College London NHS Trust revealed the following figures:

  • Silver Nitrate content of Deproxin solution: 10 – 25mg/l
  • Silver Nitrate deposited on room surfaces after a single cycle: 1.5 – 2.5mg/m2

An independent test of the same parameters by Butterworth gave similar results:

  • (Deproxin) Silver expressed as Ag (by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy) 51.0mg/l
  • (Deproxin) Nitrate expressed as NO(by ion chromatography)  35.1mg/l

Surface deposits after single cycle:

  • (Surface) Silver expressed as Ag (by Plasma Emission Spectroscopy) 2.5mg/m2
  • (Surface) Nitrate expressed as NO(by ion chromatography) 1.8mg/m2

Silver nitrate is persistent in the environment, and will build up cumulatively each time a room is processed. The permitted level of silver nitrate dust in the air is vanishingly small. The legal maximum is 0.01mg/m³ –  250 times this amount of the chemical is deposited on each square metre of surface per process! 

This presents a particular danger to hospital staff making up the bed after a Deprox process – laying down the mattress and placing sheets will disturb clouds of the fine dust at very hazardous levels. Staff should certainly be provided with appropriate respiratory equipment for this task, and silver nitrate dust levels should be monitored before readmitting patients. 

Rooms that have become heavily contaminated by multiple processes may need decontaminating by Hazchem professionals.

Silver Nitrate deposits at the Royal Liverpool Hospital

capture

Isolation rooms at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital have become so heavily contaminated with silver nitrate that patients have complained, mistaking the black deposits on the windows for dirt. Director of nursing Lisa Grant admitted that the Hydrogen Peroxide Vapour (HPV) bio-decontamination system leaves a “sterile residue” but was apparently unaware that it is silver nitrate. The photo above was submitted to The Liverpool Echo by a patient who attempted to remove the chemical with a tissue. There is enough silver nitrate on the tissue to cause unpleasant chemical burns to the skin. Even more seriously, the AgNO3 dust levels in the room must have been far in excess of the legal maximum, which is an invisibly small 0.01mg/m³ – that’s 1/100,000th of a gram per cubic metre of air.

Rick Fentiman

Rick Fentiman claims to be a "Cambridge graduate microbiologist"