Freedom of Information request reveals exact C. difficile/Deprox correlation.

C. difficile 1

A Freedom of Information request¹ to UCLH disclosed the starting and finishing dates of their disastrous Deprox decontamination contract with Hygiene Solutions Ltd. The Deprox operations started in June 2013 and ran continuously, 7 days per week through to October 2016. The contract called for at least 4 Deprox units to be at the hospital, and 6 or more processes to be completed daily.

However, due to frequent breakdowns, Hygiene Solutions struggled to meet their obligations, and on occasion asked engineers to put a non-functional Deprox unit in a room, tape up the door and “run” a process – thus not only defrauding the NHS but leaving a dangerously contaminated room that the staff believed to have been sterilized.

Plotting the contract dates against the quarterly UCLH C. difficile data² (extended through 2016 with mandatory government reporting data)³  reveals an exact correlation between the period of Deprox deployment and a substantial step change in the number of C.difficile infections  – approximately 70 extra cases over the 29 month period.

According to the March 2016 government report on C. difficile mortality, the 30 day mortality rates for the London area were about 17%. –  suggesting that approximately 12 deaths in this period could be attributed to Deprox operations. Any patients who acquired C. difficile or any other Heathcare Associated Infection, (HAI) in the UCLH hospitals between June 2013 and October 2015 should consider contacting a medical negligence solicitor and seeking compensation.

Deprox pushed UCLH in to high risk category for C. diff – CQC reports.

The CQC (Care Quality Commission) makes regular evaluations of NHS trusts using a list of critical indicators. These are the Intelligent Monitoring reports. The extracts from a series of these reports below show how the “Incidence of C. difficile” indicator moved from “No evidence of risk” to “Elevated Risk” when the Deprox program was implemented. The complete reports can be found at: http://www.cqc.org.uk/provider/RRV/reports

Deprox UCLH

[1] https://www.uclh.nhs.uk/aboutus/wwd/Annual%20reviews%20plans%20and%20reports%20archive/Infection%20Control%20Annual%20Report%202015-16.pdf  (See graph, p.17)

[2] https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/clostridium-difficile-infection-monthly-data-by-nhs-acute-trust

[3] https://www.uclh.nhs.uk/aboutus/FOI/FOI%20disclosure%20list/FOI2017271Response.pdf

https://www.dropbox.com/s/71u3j3fcdqwqfnj/ResponseFOI2017271.xlsx%20%28~13%20KB%29.URL?dl=0

“A despicable act.” – Judge Williams speaks out on NHS fraud.

Judge Adele Williams

Judge Adele Williams

Judgement was pronounced on a £26,000 NHS fraud last week. The perpetrators only escaped jail as they had pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity and had repaid the money in full.

But Judge Adele Williams described it as a

” – mean, thoroughly dishonest and cynical fraud.”

She said further: –

“To deprive the NHS even indirectly of cash and funds when it is hard-pressed and needs every penny available is a despicable act.”

What would the Judge have to say to the perpetrators of an £8,000,000 fraud against the NHS? Even if the directors of Hygiene Solutions were to refund the NHS for the tens of thousands of fraudulent Deprox processes they have done over the years, (see https://deproxfraud.info/2017/03/13/leaked-emails-prove-test-cheating-bodily-harm-and-massive-fraud/ )  would they escape jail?

The following comment was received from a retired NHS nurse today…
“Rick F should be forced to make reparation on top of all due penalties. I suggest that he should, after being found guilty of fraud, be forced to attend the next infection prevention conference, with patient groups invited to give family impact statements in cases where relatives have become infected when Deprox has been in house. What the nurses would like to do with him I will leave to your imagination.”